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The 88th Regional Support Command’s Crisis Action Team members conduct a Continuity of Operations Plan Exercise on Fort McCoy, Wis., Oct.14. Charles Hudson (center left), 88th RSC chief of staff, collects feedback from CAT members after leading a series of scenarios ranging from minor events resulting in a few hours of disturbance in operations to catastrophic events that required permanent relocation of headquarters operations. “The COOP’s priority of effort is to ensure mission essential functions are met,” Hudson said, “and then to ensure minimum degradation of customer support to commands within the 88th RSC geographic area of responsibility.”
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Extensive damage documented by the 88th Regional Support Command of Equipment Concentration Site – 66 at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., after being struck by a tornado on Dec. 31, 2010. Continuity of Operation Plans allow the 88th RSC to maintain mission essential functions in this type of emergency. In order to be prepared for future emergencies, the 88th RSC’s Crisis Action Team members conducted a Continuity of Operations Plan Exercise on Ft. McCoy, Wis., Oct.14. Charles Hudson, 88th Regional Support Command chief of staff said he knows firsthand how important it is to have a COOP in place in the event of a natural disaster.

“The COOP’s priority of effort is to ensure mission essential functions are met,” Hudson said, “and then to ensure minimum degradation of customer support to commands within the 88th RSC geographic area of responsibility.” “The ability to implement the COOP was instrumental to recovery operations at Equipment Concentration Site – 66 at Fort Leonard Wood when it was struck by a tornado on December 31st, 2010,” Hudson explained. “Fortunately this was a federal holiday or we would have experienced loss of life.  As it was, we lost $2.7M in equipment destroyed, $3.4M in equipment damage, and $5.5M in facilities repair and replacement,” Hudson continued. “We accounted for 100 percent of ECS personnel that day, none were impacted personally, and most were called in to work over the weekend to secure equipment and facilities, account for property and begin the slow recovery process,” Hudson said. “It took nearly a year for ECS-66 to recover from this event and much of that time was spent operating in temporary facilities elsewhere on Fort Leonard Wood. In addition, warehouse operations had to move 140 miles to an available warehouse at Weldon Springs Local Training Area in Saint Charles, Mo., Hudson said. “Given this real-world scenario,” Hudson said, “a COOP for the 88th RSC Headquarters is very important.”
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Extensive damage documented by the 88th Regional Support Command of Equipment Concentration Site – 66 at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., after being struck by a tornado on Dec. 31, 2010. Continuity of Operation Plans allow the 88th RSC to maintain mission essential functions in this type of emergency. In order to be prepared for future emergencies, the 88th RSC’s Crisis Action Team members conducted a Continuity of Operations Plan Exercise on Fort McCoy, Wis., Oct.14. Charles Hudson, 88th Regional Support Command chief of staff said he knows firsthand how important it is to have a COOP in place in the event of a natural disaster. 

“The COOP’s priority of effort is to ensure mission essential functions are met,” Hudson said, “and then to ensure minimum degradation of customer support to commands within the 88th RSC geographic area of responsibility.”


“The ability to implement the COOP was instrumental to recovery operations at Equipment Concentration Site – 66 at Fort Leonard Wood when it was struck by a tornado on December 31st, 2010,” Hudson explained.

“Fortunately this was a Federal Holiday or we would have experienced loss of life.  As it was, we lost $2.7M in equipment destroyed, $3.4M in equipment damage, and $5.5M in facilities repair and replacement,” Hudson continued.

“We accounted for 100% of ECS personnel that day, none were impacted personally, and most were called in to work over the weekend to secure equipment and facilities, account for property and begin the slow recovery process,” Hudson said.

“It took nearly a year for ECS-66 to recover from this event and much of that time was spent operating in temporary facilities elsewhere on Fort Leonard Wood. In addition, warehouse operations had to move 140 miles to an available warehouse at Weldon Springs Local Training Area in Saint Charles, Mo., Hudson said.

“Given this real-world scenario,” Hudson said, “a COOP for the 88th RSC Headquarters is very important.”
Download Full Image Photo Details
Extensive damage documented by the 88th Regional Support Command of Equipment Concentration Site – 66 at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., after being struck by a tornado on Dec. 31, 2010. Continuity of Operation Plans allow the 88th RSC to maintain mission essential functions in this type of emergency. In order to be prepared for future emergencies, the 88th RSC’s Crisis Action Team members conducted a Continuity of Operations Plan Exercise on Fort McCoy, Wis., Oct.14. Charles Hudson, 88th Regional Support Command chief of staff said he knows firsthand how important it is to have a COOP in place in the event of a natural disaster.

“The COOP’s priority of effort is to ensure mission essential functions are met,” Hudson said, “and then to ensure minimum degradation of customer support to commands within the 88th RSC geographic area of responsibility.”


“The ability to implement the COOP was instrumental to recovery operations at Equipment Concentration Site – 66 at Fort Leonard Wood when it was struck by a tornado on December 31st, 2010,” Hudson explained.

“Fortunately this was a Federal Holiday or we would have experienced loss of life.  As it was, we lost $2.7M in equipment destroyed, $3.4M in equipment damage, and $5.5M in facilities repair and replacement,” Hudson continued.

“We accounted for 100% of ECS personnel that day, none were impacted personally, and most were called in to work over the weekend to secure equipment and facilities, account for property and begin the slow recovery process,” Hudson said.

“It took nearly a year for ECS-66 to recover from this event and much of that time was spent operating in temporary facilities elsewhere on Fort Leonard Wood. In addition, warehouse operations had to move 140 miles to an available warehouse at Weldon Springs Local Training Area in Saint Charles, Mo., Hudson said.

“Given this real-world scenario,” Hudson said, “a COOP for the 88th RSC Headquarters is very important.”
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Army Reserve Brig. Gen. William Barriage, the commanding general of the 351st Civil Affairs Command, talks to Soldiers, families and friends during the Change of Responsibility Ceremony held at Moffett Field, Calif., Oct. 17. Command Sgt. Maj. Gregory Thomsen took the helm as the senior enlisted Soldier from Command Sgt. Maj. Mark Martello. The 351st CACOM has more than 2,100 Soldiers in eight states, to include Hawaii. The 351st CACOM is assigned to the U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) based at Fort Bragg, N.C. USACAPOC (A) has more than 13,000 Soldiers with Civil Affairs, Psychological Operations and Information Operations units across the country. USACAPOC(A) has 94 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ CA Capability, 100 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ PSYOP Capability and 42 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ I/O Capability. The command also has oversight of all Army Reserve airborne operations.
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Army Reserve Brig. Gen. William Barriage, the commanding general of the 351st Civil Affairs Command, holds a sword during the Change of Responsibility Ceremony held at Moffett Field, Calif., Oct. 17. Command Sgt. Maj. Gregory Thomsen took the helm as the senior enlisted Soldier from Command Sgt. Maj. Mark Martello. The 351st CACOM has more than 2,100 Soldiers in eight states, to include Hawaii. The 351st CACOM is assigned to the U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) based at Fort Bragg, N.C. USACAPOC (A) has more than 13,000 Soldiers with Civil Affairs, Psychological Operations and Information Operations units across the country. USACAPOC(A) has 94 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ CA Capability, 100 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ PSYOP Capability and 42 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ I/O Capability. The command also has oversight of all Army Reserve airborne operations.
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An Army Reserve Soldier assigned to the 351st Civil Affairs Command, salutes during the national anthem during the Change of Responsibility Ceremony held at Moffett Field, Calif., Oct. 17. Command Sgt. Maj. Gregory Thomsen took the helm as the senior enlisted Soldier from Command Sgt. Maj. Mark Martello. The 351st CACOM has more than 2,100 Soldiers in eight states, to include Hawaii. The 351st CACOM is assigned to the U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) based at Fort Bragg, N.C. USACAPOC (A) has more than 13,000 Soldiers with Civil Affairs, Psychological Operations and Information Operations units across the country. USACAPOC(A) has 94 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ CA Capability, 100 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ PSYOP Capability and 42 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ I/O Capability. The command also has oversight of all Army Reserve airborne operations.
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Army Reserve Command Sgt. Maj. Mark Martello talks with Soldiers, friends and families during the 351st Civil Affairs Command’s Change of Responsibility Ceremony held at Moffett Field, Calif., Oct. 17. Command Sgt. Maj. Gregory Thomsen took the helm as the senior enlisted Soldier from Martello. The 351st CACOM has more than 2,100 Soldiers in eight states, to include Hawaii. The 351st CACOM is assigned to the U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) based at Fort Bragg, N.C. USACAPOC (A) has more than 13,000 Soldiers with Civil Affairs, Psychological Operations and Information Operations units across the country. USACAPOC(A) has 94 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ CA Capability, 100 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ PSYOP Capability and 42 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ I/O Capability. The command also has oversight of all Army Reserve airborne operations.
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Army Reserve Brig. Gen. William Barriage (right), the commanding general of the 351st Civil Affairs Command, receives the sword from Command Sgt. Maj. Mark Martello during the Change of Responsibility Ceremony held at Moffett Field, Calif., Oct. 17. Command Sgt. Maj. Gregory Thomsen took the helm as the senior enlisted Soldier from Martello. The 351st CACOM has more than 2,100 Soldiers in eight states, to include Hawaii. The 351st CACOM is assigned to the U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) based at Fort Bragg, N.C. USACAPOC (A) has more than 13,000 Soldiers with Civil Affairs, Psychological Operations and Information Operations units across the country. USACAPOC(A) has 94 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ CA Capability, 100 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ PSYOP Capability and 42 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ I/O Capability. The command also has oversight of all Army Reserve airborne operations.
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Army Reserve Command Sgt. Maj. Gregory Thomsen talks with Soldiers, friends and families during the 351st Civil Affairs Command’s Change of Responsibility Ceremony held at Moffett Field, Calif., Oct. 17. Thomsen took the helm as the senior enlisted Soldier from Command Sgt. Maj. Mark Martello. The 351st CACOM has more than 2,100 Soldiers in eight states, to include Hawaii. The 351st CACOM is assigned to the U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) based at Fort Bragg, N.C. USACAPOC (A) has more than 13,000 Soldiers with Civil Affairs, Psychological Operations and Information Operations units across the country. USACAPOC(A) has 94 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ CA Capability, 100 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ PSYOP Capability and 42 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ I/O Capability. The command also has oversight of all Army Reserve airborne operations.
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Army Reserve Brig. Gen. William Barriage (right), the commanding general of the 351st Civil Affairs Command, passes the sword to Command Sgt. Maj. Gregory Thomsen during the Change of Responsibility Ceremony held at Moffett Field, Calif., Oct. 17. Thomsen took the helm as the senior enlisted Soldier from Command Sgt. Maj. Mark Martello. The 351st CACOM has more than 2,100 Soldiers in eight states, to include Hawaii. The 351st CACOM is assigned to the U.S. Army Civil Affairs and Psychological Operations Command (Airborne) based at Fort Bragg, N.C. USACAPOC (A) has more than 13,000 Soldiers with Civil Affairs, Psychological Operations and Information Operations units across the country. USACAPOC(A) has 94 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ CA Capability, 100 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ PSYOP Capability and 42 percent of the Army’s General Purpose Forces’ I/O Capability. The command also has oversight of all Army Reserve airborne operations.
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